Makers

List of all Makers associated with collection. Selecting a Maker name will display connected items.

A

A.H. Woodward

Alfred Havilah Woodward was a stationer/pencil case maker in Birmingham, U.K., in the late 1800’s and very early 1900’s.

(3 items)

AG Days

Many BHR pencils from the mid-late 1800's bear the imprint "AG Days Pat Aug 10 58". The patent refers to the BHR casing on the pencil. Austin G. Days wasn't actually a pencil case maker, but he was the holder of a U.S. patent of that date, which claims "improvements" over Nelson Goodyear's BHR casing material. A.G. Days was a cousin to Nelson Goodyear (the “G” in AG Days stands for Goodyear, his middle name).

(3 items)

Aikin Lambert

James Aikin and Henry Lambert were New York jewellers that had become partners following the civil war, intent on cashing in on the growing pencil/pen industry. In addition to their pens & pencils, they made gold pen nibs and became a supplier of nibs to Lewis Waterman. A L & Co. lasted from 1864-1932, when they were taken over by Waterman.

(5 items)

Albert Bagley

Albert Bagley was an early American pen & pencil case maker. His most widely known improvement to pencil cases was U.S. Patent # 006981, which created a double layered tube on the upper half of the pencil case, allowing the item to be extended to a full length for ease of writing. His pencils and combinations rarely had his name on them, but the inner upper barrel would have the patent date - January 1, 1850.

(1 item)

Alfred Taylor

Alfred Taylor was a known silversmith in Birmingham, England, in the mid-1800's. This Wellington pencil is the only pencil case designed/manufactured by Alfred Taylor that I have come across to date, and it is made of German Silver.

(1 item)

Arthur Downing Ltd.

Arthur Downing was a Birmingham silversmith. A.D. Ltd. was in operation from the late 1800's through early 1900's, making a variety of smaller objects including cigar cutters & pencil cases.

(1 item)

Asprey

Founded in 1781 by William Asprey, it began as a silk printing business but rapidly grew to eventually become widely recognized as a luxury emporium, making many of their luxury items using their own craftsmen, as well as sourcing products from other high end makers such as George Betjemann & Sons (London) . The Asprey flagship store opened on New Bond Street in London in 1847.

(2 items)
B

Barritt & Co

(1 item)

Berry

(2 items)
C

Cocks & Bettridge

Cocks & Bettridge were a Birmingham, U.K. firm of silver & goldsmiths.

(1 item)

Conway Stewart

The maker of some of the most popular English pens and pencils of the 20th century, Conway Stewarts were marketed between 1905 and 1977. Hundreds of different models were manufactured, in a wide variety of colours, patterns and styles.

(1 item)
D

De La Rue

Thomas de la Rue (1793-1866), was born in Guernsey. He apprenticed as a printer in Guernsey and then established his own business in London in 1816. He began making straw hats, then playing cards, stamps, eventually offering his customers a wide variety of stationery items as evidenced by the TDLR items in the collection. 200+ years on and De La Rue is still in business, and are the world's largest commercial banknote printer.

(3 items)

Doulton

(1 item)

Drew & Sons

(1 item)

Dudson

(1 item)
E

Edward Baker

E. Baker was a Birmingham silversmith. In addition to the company's own products, around 1936 they also bought out the Mordan brand. Following the second world war, Baker was acquired by Yard-O-Led company.

(1 item)

Edward Todd

Edward Todd (the company) was established in 1871 after Edward Todd (the person) took over Kurtz & Monaghan, and the company remained in business for over half a century. Edward Todd had already been active in the pencil case business for quite a long time prior to establishing a firm in his own name, having partnered at various times with John Mabie; H.M. Smith; and Newton, Kurtz & Co..

(6 items)

Eversharp

(1 item)
F

Finnigans

(1 item)

Francis Mordan

Francis Mordan was a son of Sampson Mordan. While Sampson's other two sons eventually took over S. Mordan & Co., Francis went his own way. He established his gold pen (nib) making business, F. Mordan & Co., in London in the late 1830's. Francis died in 1868, but his business remained in operation until approximately 1906.

(9 items)
G

G. Betjemann

(1 item)

Gabriel Riddle

Gabriel Riddle was a successful and well connected London stationer that became a partner and financial backer for Sampson Mordan in 1823. Their business relationship lasted until December, 1836, at which point they went their separate ways, with Riddle establishing his own business making pencil cases and filing his first maker's mark shortly thereafter.

(4 items)

George Hatch

George Hatch worked for the New England Glass Company, and was a skilled glass artisan, as well as being their head salesman. He held a number of interesting glassware design patents. In October, 1875, Hatch filed design patent #8,831 (granted in December 1875) for a glass inkstand depicting a pear & leaves (the one in the collection). By early 1876 he had left NEGC and was working for the Meriden Flint Glass Company, a new company located in Meriden, Connecticut.

(1 item)

Goode & Co.

(1 item)

Gorham

(1 item)
H

H. Morrell

(1 item)

H.G. & S.

(1 item)

H.J.H.

(1 item)

H.M. Smith

H.M. Smith was an American company, established by Horace M. Smith, and located in New York. Jonathan Veley, in a 2018 entry in his "Leadhead's Pencil Blog", indicated that Smith started in 1865 and retired from the firm in 1896, with it going bankrupt very shortly thereafter. In addition to pen/pencil case making, Smith also made toothpicks, watches, and was a retailer for Wirt fountain pens. He sold some Wirt pens to Mark Twain who was said to have been so pleased with them that he later appeared in some Wirt advertisements.

(2 items)

H.W. Bedford

(1 item)

Heintz

(2 items)

Hyde

(1 item)

Hyde & Co.

(2 items)
I
J

J. Field

(4 items)

J. Longmore

(2 items)

Jacob Lownds

Jacob Lownds was one of the earliest American pencil case makers. His first patent (# 32) predates that of Thomas Addison by two years. He created a very novel way of opening the pencil by extending the barrel, giving it a quarter turn to engage an inner pin and then pushing the barrel forward.

(2 items)

James Fenton

(1 item)

John Hague

John Hague was a very early American pencil case inventor/maker. He had two pencil case patents; one in 1833 and the other in 1839. In the late 1830's he was partnered with Samuel Maycock and also produced their own "hard times tokens".

(2 items)

John Heath

(6 items)

John Holland

John Holland was born in Ireland in 1838 and emigrated to the U.S. (Ohio) with his family in 1848. After apprenticing with pen maker George W. Sheppard, he eventually acquired the business. The "John Holland Gold Pen Company" remained in business util around 1950. John Holland died in 1917.

(3 items)

John Knapp

There are several excellent entries in the LEADHEAD'S PENCIL BLOG by Jonathan Veley, tracing John Knapp's activities in New York's pencil case business in the mid-late 1800's, and the variety of well-known partners that he had over the years. At some point Knapp ended up on his own, and on February 6, 1872, Knapp filed patent #123,485.

(1 item)

John Mabie

(2 items)

John Rauch

(5 items)

John Sheldon

Born in Birmingham in the first decade of the 19th century, John Sheldon was a very inventive, and creative, toymaker, pencil maker, and silversmith. His writing related items included his "Unique Pocket Companion" which provided the traveller with pen, pencil, postal balance, toothpick, & coin gauge. Also the Telescopic Pocket Balance graduated for world wide postal rates. In all, John Sheldon registered eleven different designs for writing equipment between 1842 and 1853. Sheldon died in 1863.

(3 items)

Josh Baker

(3 items)

Joshua Butler

Joshua Butler began his business as a smallworker in London around 1822. Not long after Mordan's patented ever-pointed pencils hit the streets, Butler began making and marketing his own "improved" version of the ever-pointed pencil. His early (1820's) pencils had hobnail finials, with "Butler, London" imprint. while later pencils had a fuller description, eg. "J. Butler Maker, London". Butler retired in 1836, with Thomas Wise and Eliezer Nash subsequently taking over the business, but continuing to produce Butler pencils in addition to their own brand "WN".

(2 items)

Judson's

(1 item)
K
L

Lamy

(1 item)

Lyons

(2 items)
M

Mabie Todd

(7 items)

Moncrieff

(1 item)

Mumm & Zaum

(1 item)
N

Nelson Goodyear

Many BHR pencils from the mid-late 1800’s bear the imprint ““Goodyears Pat May 6 51””. The patent refers to the BHR casing on the pencil. Nelson Goodyear wasn’t actually a pencil case maker, but he was the holder of a U.S. patent of that date for his BHR casing material. Nelson Goodyear was a cousin to AG. days.

(5 items)
O
P

Parker

(12 items)

Parker & Acott

Using information found on a combo in the collection - "Registered Dec 11 1847", it appears that this date relates to a design patent for a "compound pen and pencil-case", filed by Timothy Parker and Thomas Acott, of Birmingham.

(1 item)

Perry (E.S.)

Following the death of James Perry (Perry & Co.), his brother Stephen continued to run the business. He, in turn, was succeeded by his two sons, John & Lewis. John's son Edmund eventually became Joint Managing Director, but upon his father's death in 1918 Edmund left the company and established "E.S. Perry", successfully perfecting the manufacture of stainless steel pens. During the second world war E.S. Perry ceased pen manufacturing and converted to making armament components.

(1 item)

Perry & Co.

James Perry was originally an educator. In the early 1800's he began making steel pens by hands to give out to his students as he was so dissatisfied with what was available in the marketplace at the time. James Perry & Co. was established in 1824 in Manchester, making pens, as well as a variety of other stationery products. The business eventually relocated to London. As of 1829, all of Perry's pens were actually being made by Josiah Mason, considered to be the finest pen maker at the time. Sometime after 1847 the company was renamed "Perry & Co.".

(18 items)

Pitkin

(1 item)
Q
R

R.L. Henry

(1 item)

Ranleigh

(1 item)

Richard Mosley

Richard Mosley was an early 19th century pencil case maker, with his business located in London's famous jewellery quarter, Hatton Garden. The connection to Robert Mosley, a Birmingham maker is confusing at best, as I discovered while trying to sort through what family history sources I could find. The "RM" imprint seems to have been used by both at various times (but not at the same time), and it is likely there is a family connection.

(3 items)

RitePoint

(1 item)

Robert Mosley

Robert Mosley was an early 19th century pencil case maker, located in Birmingham. The connection to Richard Mosley, a pencil case maker located in London's Hatton Garden, is confusing at best, as I discovered while trying to sort through what family history sources I could find. The "RM" imprint seems to have been used by both at various times (but not at the same time), and it is likely there is a family connection.

(1 item)
S

S. Mordan & Co.

Sampson Mordan is recognized as the co-inventor of the mechanical pencil, having filed the first patent (#4742) in England, in 1822, jointly with John Isaac Hawkins. Shortly after filing the patent, Mordan bought out Hawkins and established a partnership with London stationer, Gabriel Riddle. The Mordan Riddle relationship was dissolved in 1836, with each going their own way and both continuing to be pencil case makers. Following Sampson's death in 1843, the business was carried on by two of his sons, Sampson Jr. and Augustus.

(143 items)

Scott & Co.

(1 item)

Sir Josiah Mason

Josiah Mason was a Birmingham industrialist; born in 1795 and died in 1881. His primary business was the production of steel pens. He was the U.K.'s largest producer of steel pens during this period, his products being branded and marketed by James Perry (Perry & Co.). Mason was knighted in 1872 for his philanthropy, and Mason Science College, which he founded in 1875, later became University of Birmingham.

(2 items)

Stafford's

(1 item)

Stiff & Sons

(1 item)
T

Thomas Addison

Thomas Addison was one of the earliest American pencil case makers. Patent #736 was for "Addison's Improved Ever-Pointed Pencil Case" - May 10, 1838.

(4 items)
U

Unknown

(184 items)
V
W

W.S. Hicks

(10 items)

Waterman

(1 item)

Wedgwood

(2 items)

William Lund

William Lund was a wood & ivory turner, and son of the well known Thomas Lund, also a turner. They were makers of boxes, chess sets, and all manner of small items. In 1848, William Riddle (son of Gabriel Riddle) filed patent # 12383 and shortly thereafter disposed of it to William Lund.

(5 items)

Williams

(3 items)

Wilmot & Co.

(2 items)

Wise

Jacob Wise (alternatively spelled "Wyse") was an early metallic pen maker from London, England. His 1803 pen design was a barrel shaped steel pen, mounted in a bone case. They were quite expensive at the time and not widely adopted.

(1 item)

Wise & Nash

In 1835, Thomas Wise became a partner in J. Butler & Co.. Subsequent to Butler's retirement in 1836 Eliezer Nash became a partner, with the company becoming Wise & Nash. W & N continued to manufacture "Butler & Co." branded pencils as well as their own brand until 1849 when their partnership was dissolved. Nash is known to have continued to manufacture Butler & Co. everpointed pencils as late as 1852.

(2 items)

WM

(1 item)
X
Y

Yard O Led

Yard O Led is located in Birmingham. It was founded in 1934 by Ludwig Brenner and Frank Tuffnel (who had previously worked for S. Mordan & Co.). Brenner had developed a self propelling pencil holding twelve three-inch leads, the iconic "Yard O Led". In the 1950's, YOL acquired and merged with Edward Baker, obtaining the Mordan patents as part of the acquisition. Over time, Yard O Led's portfolio has expanded from pencils to pens, with every one of their writing instruments being assembled and decorated by hand.

(1 item)